Saturday, February 18, 2012
Quoth David Bromwich:

“The Plumb-Pudding in Danger;—or—State Epicures Taking un Petit Souper”  (1805) is in the show, and it is one of [James] Gillray’s best. You see Pitt  lean and joyless here, yet wonderfully potent; he holds in reserve the  shrewdness of a card player and the patience of a master poisoner. As he  slices the pudding of Europe with his fellow diner, Napoleon, his eyes  are calm and focused while Napoleon’s are popping with appetite. Poor  Napoleon: his huge hunger is mounted on a tiny frame, and the red and  blue feathers that sprout from his cap are as long as his legs.

Quoth David Bromwich:

“The Plumb-Pudding in Danger;—or—State Epicures Taking un Petit Souper” (1805) is in the show, and it is one of [James] Gillray’s best. You see Pitt lean and joyless here, yet wonderfully potent; he holds in reserve the shrewdness of a card player and the patience of a master poisoner. As he slices the pudding of Europe with his fellow diner, Napoleon, his eyes are calm and focused while Napoleon’s are popping with appetite. Poor Napoleon: his huge hunger is mounted on a tiny frame, and the red and blue feathers that sprout from his cap are as long as his legs.